Trustee Election
These are the original issues in this subcategory
  • NET NEUTRALITY
  • WHISTLEBLOWERS
  • POLICE MILITARIZATION
Winning Issue » NET NEUTRALITY


The Internet is credited with enabling possibilities unimagined a generation ago. It has lowered the cost of launching a new idea, ignited new political movements, brought communities closer together, and has been one of the most significant democratizing influences the world has ever known. One reason for its success is that all Internet traffic is treated equally, giving each user the opportunity to be seen and heard. Net neutrality refers to the concept that an open Internet allows for all websites, both large and small, to have the same speed and access to customers and audiences regardless of content, application or platform. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon want to prioritize Web traffic by reserving the fastest loading speeds for those paying the highest access fees, relegating all other content to a slower tier of service. Critics say these fees would destroy an open Internet by severely limiting the ability of small websites to communicate with the people they need to reach, and stack the odds against the success of startup ventures. They say ISPs could also block content and speech they don’t like, and reject apps that compete with their own offerings.

Opponents of net neutrality say recent studies show Netflix and You Tube now consume 50% of the total Internet bandwidth, and warn this disproportionate usage will only increase as similar services propagate. They claim if large data users continue to consume more and more bandwidth, consumer Internet costs will increase and their access, speed and performance will decrease. They claim regulation is preferable to neutrality, saying rules could be enacted to prevent IPS abuse and a complaint resolution process could be established for consumers and small businesses. They wish to allow providers to offer faster speeds to large data users and charge accordingly, while providing a basic level of acceptable service to those not paying a premium price.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is now completing new regulations for broadband service providers. More than 4 million Americans have submitted public comments during this process, the vast majority of which are in favor of keeping an open, neutral Internet. To ensure net neutrality, President Obama has recently asked the FCC to include rules which prohibit a broadband provider from blocking users from viewing legal websites, or intentionally slowing down or speeding up content based on a type of service or an ISP’s preferences. He also wants to ensure the points of interconnection between the ISP and consumers are transparent, and to ban paid prioritization by Broadband providers.


Pending Legislation:
S.40 Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2015




Options


  • I oppose reforming current net neutrality policy and wish to defeat S.40 Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2015, and also wish to donate resources to the campaign committee of either Rep. Paul Ryan or Sen. Mitch McConnell
  • I support prohibiting broadband providers, in transmitting network traffic over the broadband Internet access service of an end user, from: (1) entering an agreement with a provider of Internet content, applications, services, or access devices to give preferential treatment or priority to the traffic in exchange for consideration (commonly referred to as "paid prioritization"); and (2) giving preferential treatment or priority to content, applications, services, or devices that are provided or operated by such broadband provider or an affiliate of such broadband provider, and wish to pass S.40 Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2015, and also wish to donate resources to either the campaign committees of Sen. John Thune (SD) and/or Sen. Patrick Leahy (VT), or to an advocate group currently working with this issue


Winning Option
  • I support prohibiting broadband providers, in transmitting network traffic over the broadband Internet access service of an end user, from: (1) entering an agreement with a provider of Internet content, applications, services, or access devices to give preferential treatment or priority to the traffic in exchange for consideration (commonly referred to as "paid prioritization"); and (2) giving preferential treatment or priority to content, applications, services, or devices that are provided or operated by such broadband provider or an affiliate of such broadband provider, and wish to pass S.40 Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2015, and also wish to donate resources to either the campaign committees of Sen. John Thune (SD) and/or Sen. Patrick Leahy (VT), or to an advocate group currently working with this issue
There has been $0.00 pledged in support of this issue
Trustee Candidates

If elected as a trustee, the campaign committee of Sen. John Thune (SD) will be unconditionally awarded the funds pledged to this issue along with a letter requesting him to favorably consider passing S.40 Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2015. If more than $1,000 has been pledged, the campaign committee of sponsor Sen. Patrick Leahy (VT) will be unconditionally awarded 10% of these funds.

Legislation: S.40 Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2015
Sponsor: Sen. Patrick Leahy, VT
Status: Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
Chairman: Sen. John Thune, SD


If elected as a trustee, EFF will be awarded the funds pledged to this issue along with a letter requesting these funds be used to work and advocate for passing a law that ensures net neutrality.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading nonprofit organization defending civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, EFF champions user privacy, free expression, and innovation through impact litigation, policy analysis, grassroots activism, and technology development. It works to ensure that rights and freedoms are enhanced and protected as our use of technology grows. Net neutrality—the idea that Internet service providers (ISPs) should treat all data that travels over their networks equally—is a principle that EFF strongly supports. It says violations of network neutrality are a real and serious problem: in recent years we have seen dozens of ISPs in the U.S. and around the world interfere with and discriminate against traffic on their networks in ways that threaten the innovative fabric of the Internet.

I wish to select my own choice of trustee from the following list of legislators:

To participate in the Trustee Election you must first pledge support to this issue.
Click here if you wish to make a pledge.
Trustee Election - Opening Date
February 27, 2020
Trustee Election - Closing Date
March 4, 2020