Trustee Election
These are the original issues in this subcategory
  • NUCLEAR WASTE
  • NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONSTRUCTION
  • NUCLEAR ACCIDENT PREPAREDNESS
Winning Issue » NUCLEAR ACCIDENT PREPAREDNESS


The federal government requires our energy companies to report accidents that result in loss of life or $50,000 in property damage. Between 1952 and 2009, at least 66 of these accidents occurred at nuclear power plants. Another 57 nuclear accidents have occurred in other countries since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster which killed 30 people, forever contaminated miles of Ukrainian real estate, and caused at least $7 billion in damages. These accident totals do not include Japan’s 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in which 3 reactors melted down and spread airborne radioactive contaminates throughout the region. For more than four years after the disaster, this crippled facility leaked about 80,000 gallons of radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean each day. Radioactive contaminates have also been found in groundwater under the plant. Fukushima was caused by a large earthquake and ensuing Tsunami which killed more than 18,000 people. However, none of these deaths have been attributed to radiation exposure. Although there are relatively few immediate fatalities from nuclear power plant accidents, health advocates warn that many people exposed to radiation during and after these events are likely to get sick later in life. When promoting future prospects for nuclear power, supporters like to say that modern nuclear power plants are much safer than ones like Fukushima which were constructed 30 years ago. However, with no nuclear power plants having been built in the last 30 years, our plants are also older designs like those at Fukushima –and presumably just as dangerous. Advocates claim the Fukushima disaster shows how little time there is for citizens to react to an escalating nuclear emergency and how important it is for local communities to be prepared for such an event. They claim Japan’s chaotic attempts to use untried and untested methods to bring these reactors under control shows how important it is for industry and government entities to be prepared as well. They say that, unlike Japan, we must prepare for nuclear plant emergencies before one may occur.


Pending Legislation: None




Options


  • I oppose reforming current nuclear accident preparedness policy and wish to donate resources to the campaign committee of either Rep. Paul Ryan or Sen. Mitch McConnell
  • I support directing the President to issue guidance on the federal response to any nuclear disaster that may be caused by a natural catastrophe, an accident, or a terrorist or other attack; occurs initially at a nuclear power plant; and disperses radiation off the reactor site and into the surrounding area. Requires such guidance to designate the single federal agency responsible for coordinating the government's efforts in response to a nuclear disaster, including making a formal declaration that a nuclear disaster exists; designate the single agency responsible for recommending the evacuation of the area within a 10-mile to 50-mile radius from the nuclear power plant; designate the single agency responsible for developing plans for, educating the public regarding, and conducting, such evacuation; designate the single agency responsible for recommending that evacuees may return following a nuclear disaster; designate the single agency responsible for conducting cleanup of a nuclear disaster; identify what cleanup standards will apply, and wish to either reintroduce H.R.1700 - Nuclear Disaster Preparedness Act (113th Congress 2013-2014), or a similar version thereof, and also wish to donate resources to the campaign committee of Rep. Eliot Engel (NY) or to an advocate group currently working with this issue


Winning Option
  • I support directing the President to issue guidance on the federal response to any nuclear disaster that may be caused by a natural catastrophe, an accident, or a terrorist or other attack; occurs initially at a nuclear power plant; and disperses radiation off the reactor site and into the surrounding area. Requires such guidance to designate the single federal agency responsible for coordinating the government's efforts in response to a nuclear disaster, including making a formal declaration that a nuclear disaster exists; designate the single agency responsible for recommending the evacuation of the area within a 10-mile to 50-mile radius from the nuclear power plant; designate the single agency responsible for developing plans for, educating the public regarding, and conducting, such evacuation; designate the single agency responsible for recommending that evacuees may return following a nuclear disaster; designate the single agency responsible for conducting cleanup of a nuclear disaster; identify what cleanup standards will apply, and wish to either reintroduce H.R.1700 - Nuclear Disaster Preparedness Act (113th Congress 2013-2014), or a similar version thereof, and also wish to donate resources to the campaign committee of Rep. Eliot Engel (NY) or to an advocate group currently working with this issue
There has been $0.00 pledged in support of this issue
Trustee Candidates

If elected as a trustee, the campaign committee of Rep. Eliot Engel (NY) will be unconditionally awarded the funds pledged to this issue along with a letter requesting him to favorably consider either reintroducing H.R.1700 - Nuclear Disaster Preparedness Act (113th Congress 2013-2014), or a similar version thereof.

If elected as a trustee, NRDC will be awarded the funds pledged to this issue along with a letter requesting these funds be used to advocate for preparing for a nuclear accident, and publicizing the dangers of our aging nuclear power plants as well as the effects of the Fukushima accident.

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is the nation's most effective environmental action group, combining the grassroots power of 1.4 million members and online activists with the courtroom clout and expertise of more than 350 lawyers, scientists and other professionals. NRDC states that the 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station demonstrates how little we still know about anticipating and mitigating nuclear risks. NRDC has actively engaged with policymakers and the public to explain the causes of the meltdowns and how such incidents can be avoided in the future. NRDC further calls for an independent inquiry into key safety issues, including nuclear reactor sitting, regulation and licensing for the 104 operating nuclear power plants in the U.S. and any new plants that may be built. The Natural Resources Defense Council believes current practices need to be thoroughly examined and reconsidered in light of the serious events at Fukushima and our more modern understanding of both man-made and natural threats to these facilities.
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Trustee Election - Opening Date
June 4, 2020
Trustee Election - Closing Date
June 10, 2020